How Alcohol Affects Motorcyclists’ Riding Skills

According to statistics tracked by the NHTSA, while the trend for motor vehicle fatalities declined from 1998 to 2007, motorcycle accident fatality statistics steadily rose — many accidents of which involved alcohol. Intoxication creates an even greater risk for motorcycle accidents — and, because motorcycles offer riders less protection than cars offer drivers, the accidents pose greater danger for motorcyclists. The National Highway Safety Transportation Administration (NHTSA) released a final report addressing the "Effects of Alcohol on Motorcycle Riding Skills." The NHTSA found that one in four car crashes that resulted in fatalities were alcohol-related. However, the rate for alcohol-related motorcycle-rider fatalities was higher — one in three. When the NHTSA tested the performance of riders driving motorcycles while impaired with blood alcohol content (BAC) levels at .08, it found that reaction time was reduced and participants passed closer to hazards and turned in the wrong direction more frequently. Intoxicated motorcycle drivers also drove faster and tended to cross outside curve boundaries.

Participants in the study reported that they had trouble riding and completing the tasks assigned to them. The study tested motorcycle drivers with considerable experience, and researchers concluded that the performances of less experienced drivers when intoxicated would show even greater impairment.

If other motorists are mainly at fault for you or a loved one’s injuries in a motorcycle accident, experienced attorneys can protect your rights and help you seek compensation. Working with experienced New York motorcycle accident lawyers can ensure the protection of your rights and maximize your chances at a favorable result. 

Rich & Rich, P.C. has decades of experience handling traffic accident cases and vigorously pursues the recovery of damages for our clients. Call 646.736.3999 to arrange your free consultation.

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